Ignition of gas vapor onboard barge Alaganik the cause of fatal explosion reveals NTSB Report

Barge Alaganik: Photo courtesy of Alex Fefelov for The Cordova Times
Barge Alaganik: Photo courtesy of Alex Fefelov for The Cordova Times

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has published an investigation report on the explosion and subsequent sinking of barge Alaganik in the Canal Passage, off Alaska in July 2019, which resulted in one fatality. The investigation identified ignition of gasoline vapor from a fuel cargo tank as key cause of the accident.

On 7 July 7 2019 an explosion occurred on the barge Alaganik as it was moored port side to the end of the Delong Dock in Whittier, Alaska. The vessel was serving as a platform for pumping fish cargo ashore from fishing vessels and tenders that came alongside. It also provided diesel fuel and gasoline to the fishing vessels. No cargo operations were ongoing when the explosion occurred.

Despite the efforts of shore-based responders to fight the ensuing fire, the vessel eventually sank in 60–80 feet of water. The Continue reading “Ignition of gas vapor onboard barge Alaganik the cause of fatal explosion reveals NTSB Report”

Four new White Papers by GMCG Global give a glimpse into the post-pandemic maritime world

Four new White Papers by GMCG Global that look at the maritime world post COVID-19 are freely available
Four new White Papers by GMCG Global that look at the maritime world post COVID-19 are freely available

The global maritime world has changed and four new White Papers by GMCG Global outline the realities and new ways of working following the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the world’s shipping industry comes to terms with the issues of post-pandemic operations, new health and safety operational parameters and the realities of the IMO’s global sulphur cap, there are still concerns about how the maritime world will cope with this accumulation of business pressures.

These White Papers by GCMG Global are freely available from the company’s website or can be downloaded from the individual links Continue reading “Four new White Papers by GMCG Global give a glimpse into the post-pandemic maritime world”

What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?

What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?
What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?

Shipping is the backbone of the global economy, responsible for about 90% of world trade. But it also accounts for almost 3% (and rising) of man-made carbon dioxide emissions. The industry’s regulator set a series of emission-cutting targets back in 2018 aimed at driving a transition away from high-polluting fossil fuels. If the more ambitious goals are to be hit, the world’s ships will need to start burning new, clean fuel by 2030; such as biofuels. The question is, which one?

1. What are the bio-bunker options for ships after 2030?
Ships burn about 5 million barrels of fossil fuel every day, pumping a constant stream of CO2 and other chemical nasties into the atmosphere. Yet figuring out the fuel of the future isn’t just about emissions. It’s got to have enough power to propel gigantic tankers around the globe, be storable and transportable, and, of course, not too costly. Here’s a list of the front- Continue reading “What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?”

Why oh why oh why are deaths still occurring in enclosed spaces?

Yves Vandenborn, of the Standard Club, asks why enclosed space entry fatalities are still happening on a regular basis. This article is reprinted from the July/August edition of Maritime Risk International.

Despite the well-known risks and the numerous publications and articles available on the topic, enclosed space entry fatalities continue to account for a significant proportion of deaths at sea to date. More drastic measures are required if the industry wishes to turn this tide.

The most recent in a long list of such incidents is the death of a chief officer who entered a fumigated hold to inspect the cargo condition. In this case, detailed instructions for the fumigation of the cargo were given to the vessel clearly stating that the fumigant was potentially Continue reading “Why oh why oh why are deaths still occurring in enclosed spaces?”

President Geoff Waddington cuts the ribbon at Murrills House official celebrations

As the Institute has finally taken ownership in recent weeks of Murrills House as its new flagship headquarters, President, Geoff Waddington, arrived (pictured right) to perform the ribbon cutting duties and ceremony to officially mark the completion.

The work to restore this magnificent Grade II listed, 500-year-old building to its former glory will begin shortly. Completion on the deal took far longer than was anticipated, but the outcome marks something of a triumph for the Institute. IIMS is soon to make a significant financial investment in essential maintenance and repair work which will only add to the value of this new asset.

Discussions have taken place with a local construction firm and the scope of work has been drawn up and agreed. The building survey Continue reading “President Geoff Waddington cuts the ribbon at Murrills House official celebrations”

Mid pandemic and IIMS finally secures its new flagship head office, Murrills House

Murrills House is the new permanent flagship headquarters for IIMS
Murrills House is the new permanent flagship headquarters for IIMS

The news has been so downbeat and tragic for so many people in recent months for the reasons we all know, so it is a good feeling to be able to share a rather more positive news story.

Back in 2018, IIMS members at the AGM voted and mandated me to find office accommodation to purchase as an asset for the Institute when our rental term expired. Little did I know that a little over two years on, we would complete the purchase of Murrills House (offices we had rented for the past 10 years) and which we now own. Yes, on Friday 31st July 2020, we formally completed the deal and are now the proud owners of a delightful Grade II Continue reading “Mid pandemic and IIMS finally secures its new flagship head office, Murrills House”

Clean Cargo report shows reduction in CO2 emissions for container shipping

Clean Cargo report shows reduction in CO2 emissions
Clean Cargo report shows reduction in CO2 emissions

According to a new report by Clean Cargo, carbon dioxide emissions from 17 of the world’s leading ocean container carriers, representing approximately 85 percent of global containerized shipping, continued to fall in 2019. Global industry averages for CO2 emissions per container per kilometer decreased by 5.6 percent and 2.5 percent for Dry and Reefer (refrigerated) indexes, respectively. The annual report indicates that container shipping continues to improve its fleet-wide environmental efficiency whilst ensuring the smooth functioning of global trade.

Continue reading “Clean Cargo report shows reduction in CO2 emissions for container shipping”

Scrubbers Coatings as important as quality material of scrubber components to prevent corrosion

Coatings for scrubbers
Coatings for scrubbers

Corrosion has emerged as the arch-enemy of the exhaust gas cleaning systems as the uptake of the technology rose with the entrance into force of the IMO 2020 sulphur cap.

Like with any new technology, scrubber maintenance and operation has been a learning curve for ship owners and operators, especially in the context of preventing failures of the technology and reducing downtime.

“Corrosion mainly happens on the overboard pipes, the last piece from GRE piping and connection to shell plating of the hull, especially near the connections and welding seams, and the area on the external hull around the overboard pipe outlet,” said Manuel Hof, Sales & Production Executive, NACE Coating Inspector Level 2 at Subsea Industries.

“These areas will need to be protected against acid-containing water (highly corrosive sulphuric acid) coming from the exhaust gas cleaning system. Continue reading “Scrubbers Coatings as important as quality material of scrubber components to prevent corrosion”

New President of The Nautical Institute to focus on three challenges

The newly elected President of The Nautical Institute, Jillian Carson-Jackson has vowed to help the Institute and wider maritime community meet three important challenges – those of diversity and inclusion, branch engagement and managing the impact of technology.

Speaking at today’s Nautical Institute Annual General Meeting she announced a pledge from the Institute on diversity and inclusion saying: “There has been a concerted effort over the past years to raise visibility of not just women, but the overall role of diversity and inclusion in maritime. The pledge of the Institute, as a global body for maritime professionals, is to show its commitment to encourage, support and celebrate a diverse and inclusive maritime industry.”

Championing the Institute’s worldwide network of branches Ms Carson-Jackson described her own branch, The Continue reading “New President of The Nautical Institute to focus on three challenges”

Geoff Waddington takes over as President of IIMS

At the Annual General Meeting of the International Institute of Marine Surveying held at Murrills House, Portchester on 16th June 2020, Geoff Waddington took up the position of President of the Institute, a position he will hold for the next two years. Geoff replaces Dubai based Capt Zarir Irani who has held the position since 2018.

In normal times, a short ceremony would have taken place as the President’s medal was formally handed from the outgoing to the incoming President, but this year, for obvious reasons, the Annual General Meeting was held in an online only capacity. However, a short video had been pre-recorded showing Capt Zarir Irani seeming to hand the medal through a Zoom screen to Geoff Waddington who appeared to take delivery of it. The wonders of modern technology and a fun gesture not lost on the large online audience.

Continue reading “Geoff Waddington takes over as President of IIMS”

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